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20110701
20110731
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CSPAN2 10
CSPAN 9
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
where we are training security forces and where we are working to provide stability against the taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get
explosives and cargo planes bound for the united states. it was the taliban and pakistan s sent a man on a failed attempt to blow up an suv in times square. it is a al qaeda is in here adherents,individuals, sometimes with little or no physical contact to al qaeda had succumbed to its hateful ideology and have a engaged in or facilitated terrorist activities in the united states. these misguided individuals are spurred on by the likes of -- -- we have seen the tragic results of that military murder and the attack in fort hood did this is the first counterterrorism strategy that focuses on the ability of rocket and its networks to inspire people to attack us -- of al qaeda and its networks to inspire people to attack us from within. president obama have made it a priority to renew american leadership in the world, strengthening our alliances, deepening partnerships. al qaeda seeks to make america look like an enemy to the world's most and -- world's muslim. al qaeda 6 to bleed as financially by dryness into a long drawn-out wars that inflame -- seeks to lead us financially by driving u
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going
effective going into the villages to talk to them to get good information where the taliban is in what it means to get more cohesive to stand on their own so we can get out of afghanistan as well. >> women on are bringing a new dynamic to the front line. the way that we conduct warfare is constantly involved -- devolving. longer first-generation and type of maneuvers that required total upper body strength and hiking 4 miles and doing hand combat. that is very important right now on the battlefield, forces are finding themselves not only with infantry but also diplomat and peacemaker there is a necessity to have the role of discussing to find out ways to have conflict resolution with the birth -- what ever we have it. >> host: also the upper body strength is important but we do find women have better endurance on average can run or into were more -- and two were more. evade different sets of skills that requires both sets to be the most effective military that we have. how do the guys feel having women in the overall? you have some very interesting snippets about for example, one of th
being impressed upon the various elements, the taliban and others in afghanistan. but, of course, that is in the middle of a huge complex, building, helping, developing projects that really is designed to one big grand strategic thing. were every look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state. wherever we are looking whether it is with iraq or iran today, or afghanistan, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
effective going into the villages and talking to them and getting good information about where the taliban is or who is aiding the enemy and more importantly what the town really needs in order for it to be more cohesive and stand on its own. so we can get out of afghanistan if you will. >> guest: absolutely. i think women are bringing in a new dynamic to the frontline and combat is always changing. the way that we conduct warfare is constantly evolving. we are no longer doing these first-generation force on force types of maneuvers that require that we have you no total upper body strength, that we are hiking for miles, that we are doing hand to hand combat and sure those skills are very important but right now on the battlefield forces are finding missiles confronted not only as infantrymen, but they are also fighting this ultimate role of diplomat and peacemaker where there is a necessity to have the role of discussing and finding out ways to -- combat resolution with whatever culture we are dealing with. >> host: even on the athletic field we found when we do the testing sure the guys
information about where the taliban is or who is aiding the enemy and more importantly what the town really needs in order for it to be more cohesive and stand on its own so that we can get out of afghanistan if you will. >> guest: absolutely. i think the women are bringing a new dynamic to the front line, and the combat is always changing. the way that we conduct warfare is evolving. we are no longer giving the first generation force on force maneuver that require that we have total upper body strength and we are hiking for miles, we are doing hand-to-hand combat and sure, those are important. but right now on the battlefield forces are finding themselves confronted not only has come to know, infantrymen but also finding themselves in the role of diplomat and peacemaker where there's the necessity to have the role of discussing and finding out ways to have conflict resolution with whatever culture we are dealing with. >> host: even on the athletic field, we found when we do the testing sure, they have the upper body strength, that's important and the, that i would say, but we are finding o
service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i woul
are extraordinary toppling the taliban pershing al qaeda training afghan forces and under the president pressure killing osama bin laden. meanwhile iraq the troops have battled brittle insurgency country to the iraqi forces, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it's now in their hands. and while it is not always -- not always makes the headlines every day, every single day our forces are serving with distinction and in far-flung corners of the world from western europe to east asia south america, north africa chia strength relentless adversaries the troops have proven themselves, proven to be innovators led by men like admiral mullen who i've always respected but worked with him every day grown to respect him more and more and more for what he has done a. if they pioneered tactics to mastered new languages, developed in the advanced new technologies. junior officers have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals and the responsibilities or extension for beyond the battlefield to politics, development tasks. we were talking about -- i was talking with
been extraordinary. toppling the taliban, pushing al qaeda from afghanistan, safe havens, training afghan forces, putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure and killing osama bin laden. meanwhile in iraq, the troops have battled, trained the forces, given the iraqi people have been opportunity for a better future. it's now in their hands. while it's not always -- it's not always makingings the headlines, every day. every single day our forces are serving with distinction in far formed corners. from west europe, south america, north africa, faced with reless -- relentless adversaries, they have proven to be not only innovators but people like admiral mullen. as they have grown, i have grown to respect him more and more. pioneered tactics, masters languages, deployed new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved only for colonels and generals. the responsibilities have extended far beyond the battlefield, politics, economics, development task. we were talking about -- i was talking with my good buddy about it i think just two days ago. it's astounding. it's a
and hold land. that is the measure of the estate of a particular organization. that is true for taliban as it is for any iraqi insurgency group. i think now have an internal safe haven. a lot of our folks have been on the violence. i would like to think sometimes there are areas that have no violence, that is coming up, it does not control it. i think if you look as some of the provinces, these places -- there is an absence of violence. this coming violence is absent, if you will print -- that just a minute pilot is absurd they have with a need to fund, to recruit >> you would say whether it is comparing now to six months or even year ago, he would say that launch anacity to attack, a strike on our homeland has been enhanced as opposed to degraded? >> their capacity to do so has been increased. we responded to the various attacks, more preventive measures. in some cases, going after them. with an industry that is on lockdown, on reduced manning, we're not completely blind we are very much operating in the dusk, almost by time but if we do not have a good understanding, i believe the hou
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
extraordinary. toppling the taliban. training afghan forces. putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure, killing osama bin laden. our troops have battled a brutal insurgency, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it is in their hands. although it does not always make the headlines, every day our forces are serving with distinction in far-flung corners of the world, from western europe to east asia, faced with relentless adversaries. our troops have proven themselves, proven to be a generation of not only warriors but innovators, led by men like admiral mullen, who i have always respected. as i have worked with him every day, i have grown to respect him even more for what he has done. the master new languages, develop and employ advanced new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals. the responsibility has extended beyond the battlefield. i was talking with my good buddy two days ago. it is astounding what you guys have trained these young men and women to do. they not only have to be warriors. they have to be politicia
ask you forces in the lead puts the lie to the taliban propaganda that international forces are there to occupy afghanistan. the afghans taken over their own security is the key to the strategy to success in afghanistan. admiral sandee winnefeld serves as commander of the north american aerospace defense command, norad was candidate. the capacities have been responsible for defense and homeland. military support to civil authorities to domestic emergencies as well as aerospace warning and control for north america. in its current capacity, he is the combatant commander responsible for the operation from the gmd mission. if confirmed as space chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, he would have a number of key roles and responsibilities related to missile defense. we will be interested to hear admiral winnefeld views on whether we should demonstrate correction of the two recent gm flight test failures before resending production or delivery of the kill vehicle for the gmd interceptors. the joint chairman of the chief of staff has a wide range of response abilities come includ
-- dismantle and defeat, reducing the -- stopping the momentum of the taliban and training of afghan security forces, we can begin to draw down our surge forces. 10,000 this year and 30,000 next year. >> has treasury secretary geithner told the president that he would like to leave -- >> not that i'm aware of no. >> i think he will be here for the foreseeable future. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> in a few brief comments before the white house briefing, the president invited leaders to the white house on thursday to continue to talk about the debt and deficit. we will give you a chance to see the president's comments again at 8:00 eastern and that will be here on c-span. the senate is in session today. earlier, they came in earlier to take up legislation on libya, but they have pulled that legislation from the floor. senate leaders pulling that resolution from the floor, according to "c.q." and harry reid is saying the most important thing to focus on is the budget and looking to discuss a resolution, s. 1323
a number of problems a number of years ago, rising taliban. are we putting those remaining troops at risk? are we going to see higher casualty counts as a result? >> it's likely. the commanders still have the mission to win and they will go about that task as we speak. they're looking at all the options and there are creatives ways they can do that. but with those kind of numbers leaving, they are frankly going to ask our troops to do more with less. that will drive up casualties as a result of this. i just wonder if that was ever given a consideration when these options were being looked at and the commanders' recommendations were being ignored. >> may not send the right message to our troops, but you would like to send a special message to our troops on this fourth of july. what is that? >> thanks for that opportunity. we're the oldest democracy in the world and the rest of the world looks to us as a model for freedom and democracy. this has come at some sacrifice to us and the american people to preserve our liberties and our values. our troops out there today are doing that very thing
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)